MHS Welsh Cobs
MHS Welsh Cobs

Bar Bay Ranch

MHS Welsh Cobs - Bar Bay Ranch MHS Welsh Cobs - Bar Bay Ranch
MHS Welsh Cobs - Bar Bay Ranch MHS Welsh Cobs - Bar Bay Ranch
MHS Welsh Cobs - Bar Bay Ranch MHS Welsh Cobs - Bar Bay Ranch
MHS Welsh Cobs - Bar Bay Ranch MHS Welsh Cobs - Bar Bay Ranch
MHS Welsh Cobs - Bar Bay Ranch MHS Welsh Cobs - Bar Bay Ranch
MHS Welsh Cobs - Bar Bay Ranch MHS Welsh Cobs - Bar Bay Ranch
MHS Welsh Cobs - Bar Bay Ranch

We are truly blessed here at BarBay Ranch/Mynydd Hir Stud with lovely views of green pastures, pine forests, golden groves of aspen, striated red cliffs, large herds of elk grazing in the fields, and the very regular appearance of not only double, but sometimes triple rainbows touching the earth in the pastures in front of our house. We have a great time with our cameras here, often hiding out on the deck to catch a quick shot of the bald eagles and hawks splashing onto the surface of our pond and emerging with some hapless fish. If you come to visit...Bring a camera!

History and Attributes of the Welsh Cob

The Welsh people set out to create a horse that would do it all; take the family out in the buggy with a snappy stylish action in his gait, have the stamina and jumping ability to go out on the hunt, be strong enough to pull the plow or cart all day, and gentle enough for the young ones to ride about the Welsh countryside. The Welsh Mountain Pony was the base stock for the Cob with infusions of Arabian, Thoroughbred, Spanish Barb, Yorkshire Coach Horse, and possibly Roadster blood, along with others. Before the Welsh Studbooks were in existence, stallions proved their worthiness to be bred by pulling a buggy uphill for 35 miles, the better ones completing the course in under 3 hours. These are some of the reasons Cobs excel in almost every discipline; in-hand, competitive riding, driving, dressage, English Pleasure, and jumping. The popular theory that the first Morgan Horse was sired by a Welsh Cob stallion is further given credence by a letter written by Justin Morgan's son explaining that the sire of the Morgan Horse was a small British stallion. Just as the Welsh Cob is very similar in appearance to the original Morgan, he is also well known for stamping his type, personality, and intelligence on his offspring. The Welsh Cob is often crossed with other breeds of horses, adding bone, temperament, and athleticism. The Thoroughbred cross is an excellent example of this crossbreeding being a very talented jumping, dressage, and eventing horse. Welsh Cob offspring from crossing a registered purebred welsh with any other breed are registerable as Half Welsh with the Welsh Pony and Cob Society of America.

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